More on the taxing of cycles (1883)

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES

Sir,—Permit me to point out another, and certainly not worse, reason than that advanced by your correspondent, who dates from the Army and Navy Club, against the imposition of a tax upon cycling machines. In this town may be seen any day workmen and artisans with their bags of tools at their backs, going to and from their employment, mounted on their “iron horses,” but for whose aid in many instances employment must be lost. In one instance a journeyman blacksmith, living, for his own reasons, in Gotherington, earns his living in Charlton Kings, between which two places lie seven good miles of distance. But for the aid of his bicycle, this man would be compelled to encounter the inconvenience of a change of residence, as there is no sufficient call for his services in the neighbourhood to enable him to fulfil his duty as breadwinner to his family. To tax machines which afford these facilities would be a blunder bordering on a crime.

I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

Cheltenham, Oct. 2.                            A COUNTY J.P

The Times, Wednesday, Oct 10, 1883; pg. 12

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